April 24-26, Norman, Oklahoma

Tribal Public Health Conference 2018

Empowering Self-Worth: Looking At Real Issues In Public Health A 7th Generation and Southern Plains Tribal Health Board Collaboration

Conference Starts in:

Welcome to the Tribal Public Health Conference 2018

Over the next couple of days, you will be presented with a host of tribal health and public health informational-related topics. We encourage you to be active participants and come eager to learn and interact with the many sponsors, partners, and talented speakers that are participating in this year's event. Enjoy yourself, ask questions, and most importantly—have fun!

What's New and What To Look for at This Year's Conference?

Beginning this year, the ‘7th Generation’ and ‘Southern Plains Tribal Health Board’ (SPTHB) have joined together to provide a joint conference to leverage resources and highlight the tremendous partnerships that have allowed our efforts to thrive over the years. Our goal to improve tribal health outcomes in tribal communities is strengthened by mutual goals as we are stronger together.

The primary focus of our conference committee’s work is to assist the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas communities to gain knowledge, sharpen their skills, and to enhance local advocacy efforts. Due to the many issues in Indian Country today, our committee members have unanimously selected the theme, “Empowering Self-Worth: Looking at Real Issues in Public Health.”

At this year’s conference, we are bringing forward several important issues affecting many families and communities including (but not limited to):

Families who have Children with Special Needs

Building Suicide Awareness Systems

Addiction and Substance Abuse

Tramatic Brain Injury in Combat Veterans

Chronic Disease/Self-Management

 

Our hope is that you’ll take away a positive experience, new partnerships, and an inspired mindset of understanding, advocacy, and sharing your story. Most importantly, we want you to have fun!

Who Should Attend?

The conference is open to everyone, however the 7G Conference Planning Committee encourages participation from Tribal Elders, tribal partners, health organizations (tribal, IHS, urban, state), clinicians and public health professionals, healthcare administration, elective tribal leaders, students, mental health, Healthy Living grantees, Turning Point coalitions, donors, legislators, and Tribal Education professionals.

A Few Things Just For You, Our Conference Participants

A lactation room will be available on site for nursing mothers. Registration will be able to direct you to the appropriate location.

A conference-wide step challenge will be underway as soon as the conference begins so be sure to wear comfortable shoes to maximize your steps! Prizes will be available at the end of the conference for those with the most steps so grab your pedometers at the registration desk and get to stepping!

Conference Agenda

2018 Tribal Public Health Conference full schedule of keynotes, plenaries, and breakout sessions.

8:30 – 12:00 P.M.Room J

Emergency Management

The purpose of Partnership is to provide guidance for Agencies and tribes to develop sustainable all hazard comprehensive approaches to terrorism and Homeland Security initiatives, and an all hazard emergency management approach that emphasizes both inter and intra jurisdictional cooperation to maximize resources in mutual aid, training, exercises, planning, and equipping.
Learning Objectives:
  • Why Are Partnerships important
  • Native Population in Region 6
  • Where you can go to get assistants in disaster
  • 8:00 – 5:00 P.M.Room K
    Carol LaRue

    Radical Resilience: Transforming STRESS to YES

    Raging stress calls for RADICAL RESILIENCE! We are living in days when we are constantly bombarded with overwhelming community and worldwide events and demands on our time- often leaving us with feelings of fatigue, anxiety, uncertainty, irritability, burn out, busy-ness, lethargy and marginal self- care practices. Our entire being - body, mind and spirit -is screaming for attention and nurturing! Can you really DO LESS and HAVE MORE? YES! This is the perfect workshop experience to help you move from “stressed out”, “burned out”, “overwhelmed”, and “too busy” to saying “YES!” again to what matters most in life, AND help those you serve do the same. This workshop is designed for both personal growth and professional development through learning and applying holistic approaches to stress management and self-care. If you are a busy professional or caregiver of any sort, give your SELF what you give to others every day. While nourishing your own body, mind and spirit, you will learn and experience The Art of Self-Health which includes simple integrative skills and practices for increasing energy, effectiveness, enjoyment, and resilience to STRESS.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Learn ways of personal empowerment for POSITIVE CHANGE -through SELF-AWARENESS, PRESENCE, MINDFULNESS, and gentle MOVEMENT.
  • Awaken and nourish the spirit of your “inner healer” through seven energy centers (chakras) and seven dimensions of well-being.
  • Learn and practice simple skills that enhance self-awareness, self-love, and effectiveness in communication both personally and professionally.
  • Learn ways of honoring your heart’s desire when creating your life, relationships, and day to day environment for optimal energy, effectiveness and healthy life balance.
  • Laugh, have fun, and be well-nourished…body, mind and spirit!
  • 08:00 – 5:00 P.M.Room L
    Clayton Small

    The Good Road of Life

    The Good Road of Life (GRL) is a culture and resilience based curriculum based upon the dissertation study of Dr. Clayton Small (Northern Cheyenne) completed at Gonzaga University. His research was on the struggles of Native men in their healing journey. A grant from ANA allowed Native PRIDE a national American Indian non-profit organization to transform the dissertation study into a curriculum that is endorsed by tribal leaders and federal agencies. The Good Road of Life is designed to assist Native men, women, youth and organizations address challenges to personal and organizational wellness including grief-losses, forgiveness, sobriety, spirituality, violence prevention, communication skills, healthy relationships, suicide prevention, action planning and team-trust building. The process is interactive and incorporates an ongoing healing theme for participants. The curriculum includes a trainer and participant manual and DVD for training of trainers.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will experience a culture and resilience based curriculum endorsed by tribal leaders and federal agencies.
  • Participants will address their personal wellness journey in a safe and sacred environment.
  • Participants will learn strategies to replicate the curriculum process in their communities.
  • 8:30 – 12:00 P.M.Room N
    Marla Cox, LaShonda Williamson Jennings

    Adverse Childhood Experience (ACEs)

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are stressful or traumatic experiences, including abuse, neglect and a range of household dysfunction such as witnessing domestic violence, or growing up with substance abuse, mental illness, parental discord, or crime in the home. ACEs are strongly related to development and prevalence of a wide range of health problems, including substance abuse, throughout the lifespan. Because ACEs are common and strongly related to a variety of substance abuse and related behavioral health outcomes, prevention of ACES and early identification of those who experience ACEs could prevent a number of negative consequences and have a significant impact on a range of critical health problems.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and substance use disorders.
  • Describe examples of how to use ACE data to inform substance abuse prevention planning.
  • 1:00 – 5:00 P.M.Room N
    Amanda Janitz, Ph.D., Sydney Martinez, Ph.D.

    Data into Action for Tribes

    The Association of American Indian Physicians, with expert consultants, offers this free one day training on how to access and utilize available data for local level public health action under a cooperative agreement with the CDC. The DIA training will focus on how to obtain data for grant opportunities and use data to conduct community needs assessments. Participants need to bring a laptop with internet capability and a health topic for developing a community assessment for hands on training with individual guidance. A few laptops and project ideas will be available, if needed. Seating is limited. Confirmation of acceptance will be provided via email.
    Objectives:
  • Gain tools and knowledge in the use of Tribal public health data
  • Conduct a Tribal Community Needs Assessment
  • Better understand Tribal Epidemiology Centers as Public Health Authorities
  • 10:30 - 12:00 P.M.Room O
    Steve Barse, Harold Barse, Thomas Poolaw, Justine Wilson, Chebon Kernell

    Importance of Art and Ceremony in Addressing Historical Trauma

    Steve Barse will introduce the concept of Historical Trauma and give several definitions of it. After viewing 2 videos, “Ceremony” (18 minutes) and “Shan Goshorn’s Baskets” (4 minutes), panel members will discuss Native veterans and ceremony, interpreting Native art as another modality for therapy, and healing concepts for individuals and communities suffering from historical trauma. Harold Barse will discuss historical trauma and its effect on Native American Veterans and point out how ceremony - cedering, sweats, pow wows, pipe - allows the veteran to re-enter the community. Artist Thomas Poolaw will discuss how viewing and creating Native American art bridges the gap of communication and brings increased connectedness with patients and their heritage. Justine Wilson/Chebon Kernell will offer some examples of how historical trauma can be explored and discussed with positive and negative results. The main focus must be on both the client and the community owning responsibility in order to succeed.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Help therapists and clients understand the importance of ceremony in the healing process for historical trauma.
  • Help therapists and clients redirect their focus by viewing and creating art.
  • Help empower the client and community to own responsibility in the historical trauma recovery process.
  • 1:00 – 5:00 P.M.Room O
    Dr. David Lee

    Gateway Cardiovascular/Diabetes Chronic Self-Management

    The goal of this session is to introduce the Gateway Cardiovascular and Diabetes Self-Management Workshop as an Evidence Based, Low-Cost Peer Led Program that empowers participants to reduce negative behaviors as well as empowers suffers to better manage their condition, for these reasons we believe Gateway is well suited to our Rural Communities. Gateway is a fun program that encourages Socialization, Problem-Solving and Decision Making Techniques, Communication Skills, and Action Planning through the adoption of proactive self-management. Gateway only requires one certified facilitator, and has no licensing fee, a huge cost saver and a plus in retaining volunteers. In a 2012 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported that 15% of Native Americans and Communities of Color in Oklahoma were reported to have Diabetes. And for the same period in these populations, approximately 58% under 75 years of age died from Cardiovascular Disease.
    The CDC Reports the following Oklahoma Statistics.
  • At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease.
  • Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes.
  • The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
  • The Gateway Program addresses ways to Reduce Stress and Encourage Exercise and Healthy Eating, adopting these strategies lesson the onset of both Heart Disease and Diabetes, increasing one’s quality of life while possibly reducing long term health cost resulting from chronic disease from the introduction of Self-Management techniques. If prevention is known to be key in reducing cardiovascular disease and diabetes, we recommend the incorporation of the evidence-based Gateway Program to our Rural Tribal Communities.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Become aware of the Gateway Evidence-Based Cardiovascular and Diabetes Program.
  • Have the awareness that there is a low cost peer-led evidence based program with a focus on self-management as a tool that impacts factors that lead to Heart Disease and Diabetes.
  • That Gateway Program can help to reduce the cost of long term health care.
  • 8:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room P
    Julie Seward, Tyler Daugherty

    Basic Life Support (BLS cert training)

    The BLS Course trains participants to promptly recognize several life-threatening emergencies, give high-quality chest compressions, deliver appropriate ventilations and provide early use of an AED. In this Instructor-led course, students will participate in simulated clinical scenarios and learning stations. Students will work with two American Heart Association Basic Life Support (BLS) Instructors to complete BLS skills practice and skills testing. For BLS Certification, students will also complete a written exam.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Recognize the signs of someone needing CPR
  • Be able to perform high quality CPR for an adult and infant
  • Demonstrate the appropriate use of an AED
  • Provide effective ventilation using a barrier device
  • Describe the technique for relief of foreign-body airway obstruction for an adult and infant
  • 8:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room Q
    Freda Carpitcher, Chris Tall Bear, Aaron Williams

    Basic Tobacco Intervention Skills: Certification for Native Communities

    The Basic Tobacco Intervention Skills for Native Communities is about behavioral change intervention and how we can use them to address commercial tobacco dependence. This program explores the Five A model that can be used in a variety of healthcare and social service settings. The Five A model offers broad application for motivating health risk behavior change across the disease prevention spectrum. The audience for the dissemination and implementation of this program includes health care providers, medical and allied healthcare staff, administrators, policymakers, community health workers, and those interested reducing smoking-related illness and disease in our Native communities.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the Five A model of smoking cessation
  • Provide a foundation to understand tobacco dependence
  • Introduce the background and communication skills needed to provide culturally sensitive interventions that support American Indian and Alaska Native people in quitting commercial tobacco products.
  • 8:30 – 8:45 A.M.MAIN LOBBY

    GENERAL SESSION

    7:45 – 4:30 P.M.
    OPEN REGISTRATION

    8:30 – 9:00 A.M.

    Blessings: Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

    Color Guards: Citizen Potawatomi Nation Veterans

    Flag Song: Alex Smith, SPTHB, Nicholas Wahpepah, SPTHB

    Welcome to the Tribal Public Health Conference A 7th Generation & Southern Plains Tribal Health Board Collaboration

    9:00 – 9:10 A.M. Opening Remarks: Edwina Butler-Wolfe, Governor, Absentee Shawnee Tribe

    9:10 – 10:00 A.M. Keynote Presentation: Understanding Trauma from Biology to Sociology

    Darryl Tonemah, Ph.D.

    10:10 – 10:30 A.M. Physical Activity Break: Step Challenge

    10:30 – 11:30 A.M. Plenary Presentation: The Importance of Culture and Resilience-Based Approaches in Indian Country, Clayton Small, Ph.D.

    11:45 – 1:00 P.M. Lunch with Special Presentation

    1:00 – 1:15 P.M. Break Before Breakout Sessions
    1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room K
    Narcisso Soliz, PharmD, MHA, Rebecca Geiger, Pharm D, MHA

    Tobacco Cessation Intervention

    The year 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. At the status quo, our nations smoking rate will still be 15% at 2050. Smoking cessation remains A Surgeon General priority. The report specifically sets goals to target Native Americans and other disproportionately affected groups. Native Americans have the highest prevalence of nicotine abuse above all ethnic groups. Smoking remains the #1 preventable cause of disease in the US. It is estimated 67% of smokers would like to quit, 44% will make an attempt this year, but only 5-7 % will be successful without help. Tobacco related illness is costly to the individual, the family, and society. A large percentage of people lack knowledge, skills, and time to provide tobacco interventions. This presentation will provide an overview of the the necessary tools to provide a nonjudgmental brief intervention and refer the tobacco user to receive more intense intervention from a healthcare professional. The presentation will highlight potential dangers associated with electronic cigarette use. We will also overview the development of a tobacco cessation program utilizing internal links and leveraging external links within the community.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Understanding the Impact of brief interventions and Motivational Interviewing
  • Establishing internal links & external links within the community
  • Developing of Tobacco Cessation Programs
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room L
    Clayton Small, Ph.D.

    Native Hope

    Native HOPE is a culture and resilience based curriculum developed by Native PRIDE and endorsed by tribal leaders and federal agencies as an effective prevention-intervention program for youth and adults that addresses suicide prevention and the related risk factors including substance abuse, violence-bullying prevention, depression and coping with stress-trauma. The training is delivered in a 3-day retreat for up to 150 participants. A 1-day training of trainers is suggested to prepare adults to assist with the delivery of the training (4-days total). The process utilizes peer-counseling (youth helping youth) and includes comprehensive follow-up, e.g. establishing youth councils, starting talking circles, and sponsoring ongoing prevention activities. The curriculum includes a trainer and participant manual, as well as, DVD for training of trainers.This program is highly effective.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will experience a culture and resilience based curriculum that focuses on suicide prevention and the related risk factors.
  • Participants will strengthen their personal wellness.
  • Participants will acquire strategies to replicate the curriculum in their communities.
  • Participants will strengthen their facilitation and group process skills
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room N
    Amanda Janitz, Ph.D., Sydney Martinez, Ph.D.

    Data into Action for Tribes (cont. from pre-conference)

    The Association of American Indian Physicians, with expert consultants, offers this free one day training on how to access and utilize available data for local level public health action under a cooperative agreement with the CDC. The DIA training will focus on how to obtain data for grant opportunities and use data to conduct community needs assessments. Participants need to bring a laptop with internet capability and a health topic for developing a community assessment for hands on training with individual guidance. A few laptops and project ideas will be available, if needed. Seating is limited. Confirmation of acceptance will be provided via email.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Gain tools and knowledge in the use of Tribal public health data
  • Conduct a Tribal Community Needs Assessment
  • Better understand Tribal Epidemiology Centers as Public Health Authorities
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room O
    Brandi Woods-LittleJohn, Alicia Lincoln, MSW, MSPH, Lisa Rhoades

    Period of Purple Crying

    Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome) is the leading cause of child abuse deaths in the United States. The Period of PURPLE Crying program is an evidence-based shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma prevention program that aims is to support caregivers and reduce the incidence of shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma. This session will discuss the prevalence of abusive head trauma in Oklahoma and activities occurring across the state to reduce the same.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Analyze Abusive Head Trauma in Oklahoma among different populations.
  • Describe and apply the Period of PURPLE crying program.
  • Review the application of Period of PURPLE crying in other areas outside of hospital settings.
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room P
    Dana Miller, Johnny Johnson

    SoonerCare and Tribal Health Care

    Presentation will highlight the partnership between the Oklahoma Health Care Authority and Oklahoma’s tribal health care community. In addition, discussion of will include the positive impact of SoonerCare reimbursement in Indian County that has contributed to increased access to care.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Attendees will learn of OHCA's programs including SoonerCare and Insure Oklahoma;
  • Attendees will understand the relationship between OHCA and the tribal health care system;
  • OHCA and attendees will learn of innovate strategies and opportunities to further collaborate successfully.
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room Q
    Clara Bushyhead, Sucharat (Gift) Tayarachakul, MPH, Melanie Johnson, MEd.

    Integrating Cultural Approaches to Prevention through “Tradition Not Addiction”

    Objective: To reduce alcohol and nonmedical use of prescription drugs among Native youth. Methods: Our methods seek population behavior change and our program is based on a combination of qualitative and quantitative data. Our program seek change in important substance use indicators in the individual, family and community domains through the use of logic models. Youth and families remain engaged in our program by 1) participation in community-based activities, 2) culture classes, 3) social media, 4) school involvement, and 5) youth led Councils. Evaluation was conducted for process and outcome. Results: Evaluations of Native populations show significant reductions in alcohol and Rx use. In addition, resiliency and other protective factors increased for program participants. Program participation was excellent for both youth and adults. Tribal government contributed additional funding. Conclusions: Culturally based prevention programs are effective in reducing alcohol and nonmedical use of prescription drugs among Native youth.
    Learning Objectives:
  • A Culturally appropriate substance abuse prevention program is capable of producing significant reductions in monthly alcohol and nonmedical use of prescription drugs over a two-year period among high disparity populations.
  • Programs that reinforce American Indian youth’s Tribal culture are popular among youth and their families.
  • Collaborative efforts among multiple stakeholders can result in substantial substance use reductions in non-reservation American Indian youth.
  • Successful Native substance abuse prevention programs are youth driven and youth focused.
  • 2:15 - 2:45 P.M.

    Afternoon Break

    2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room J
    Jason Champagne

    Native American Traditional Foods Used in Contemporary Dishes

    This is a visual cooking demonstration that is aimed at empowering and inspiring Native American people through traditional foods education, and increased knowledge of basic cooking skills. It is important for people to understand the basics of culinary arts, and incorporate basic cooking strategies to improve the overall nutrient content of foods. It uses traditional Native American foods and incorporates them into contemporary food dishes. It is very important to teach how, and why, incorporating basic nutrition education into every day meals can assist with overall health and wellness. The overall goal of the presentation is to help participants focus on healthy portion sizes and cook with whole foods; showing how to make healthy food taste good and look good within a tight budget. Indigenous foods are a path to health and a way for us to recover our communities. Healing is the most important ingredient in Native American cooking. It is my hope this presentation will encourage and inspire creativity and imagination with the food our people prepare and eat, helping them to achieve a better tomorrow. It is my hope that traditional foods will become the everyday foods for Native Americans again.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Increase knowledge of basic cooking skills, and cooking with whole foods
  • Understand basic cooking strategies to improve the overall nutrient content of foods
  • Increase ability to incorporate traditional Native American foods (corn, beans, squash, wild rice) into contemporary dishes
  • 2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room K
    Dr. Ashley Comiford

    Electronic Cigarette Use and Tobacco Exposure Biomarkers

    E-cigs are often used in order to reduce or quit smoking. American Indians (AIs) have a high prevalence of cigarette use but their use of e-cigs has never been examined in relation to smoking quit attempts or exposures to tobacco constituents. Baseline survey and biomarker data were collected for 375 adult AI smokers at a Cherokee Nation healthcare facility in 2016 for an observational cohort study. We conducted multivariate regression analyses on the data to assess associations between e-cig use and previous quit attempts, likelihood to quit smoking, confidence to quit smoking, cigarette packs smoked per day, salivary cotinine levels, and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). In adjusted analyses, current and past e-cig users were more likely than never users to report any lifetime quit attempt. Current and past users were also more likely to report a likelihood to quit smoking. E-cig use was not significantly associated with confidence to quit smoking, cigarette packs smoked per day, cotinine levels, or exhaled CO levels. While e-cig use may not be associated with these tobacco-related behaviors and exposures among current smokers, such use may indicate a higher level of readiness to quit smoking. Inquiring about e-cig use among AIs smokers may provide an opportunity for public health professionals to promote evidence-based cessation programs. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if dual users will have more success in reducing smoking than those who do not use e-cigs.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss e-cig use among American Indians, who smoke, living in Oklahoma.
  • Discuss the association between e-cig use and tobacco-related behaviors and exposures among American Indians, who smoke.
  • Discuss preliminary data from follow-up data collection of the cohort study.
  • 2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room L
    Clayton Small, Ph.D.

    Native Hope (cont’d)

    Native HOPE is a culture and resilience based curriculum developed by Native PRIDE and endorsed by tribal leaders and federal agencies as an effective prevention-intervention program for youth and adults that addresses suicide prevention and the related risk factors including substance abuse, violence-bullying prevention, depression and coping with stress-trauma. The training is delivered in a 3-day retreat for up to 150 participants. A 1-day training of trainers is suggested to prepare adults to assist with the delivery of the training (4-days total). The process utilizes peer-counseling (youth helping youth) and includes comprehensive follow-up, e.g. establishing youth councils, starting talking circles, and sponsoring ongoing prevention activities. The curriculum includes a trainer and participant manual, as well as, DVD for training of trainers.This program is highly effective.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will experience a culture and resilience based curriculum that focuses on suicide prevention and the related risk factors.
  • Participants will strengthen their personal wellness.
  • Participants will acquire strategies to replicate the curriculum in their communities.
  • Participants will strengthen their facilitation and group process skills
  • 2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room N
    Amanda Janitz, Ph.D., Sydney Martinez, Ph.D.

    Data into Action for Tribes (cont. from pre-conference)

    The Association of American Indian Physicians, with expert consultants, offers this free one day training on how to access and utilize available data for local level public health action under a cooperative agreement with the CDC. The DIA training will focus on how to obtain data for grant opportunities and use data to conduct community needs assessments. Participants need to bring a laptop with internet capability and a health topic for developing a community assessment for hands on training with individual guidance. A few laptops and project ideas will be available, if needed. Seating is limited. Confirmation of acceptance will be provided via email.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Gain tools and knowledge in the use of Tribal public health data
  • Conduct a Tribal Community Needs Assessment
  • Better understand Tribal Epidemiology Centers as Public Health Authorities
  • 2:45 – 3:45 P.M.Room O
    Brian Fehr, Michelle Nessison, Ph. D., RD/LD, BC-ADM, CDE

    Fitness Levels in American Indian Children

    American Indian (AI) children are at high risk for Chronic Disease, appropriate intervention includes whole-body assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the fitness level in American Indian children who attend TURTLE camp Fitness levels were assessed using the Fitnessgram tool and guidelines. Assessed stamina through Pacer test. Assessed abdominal strength through curl-up assessment. Assessed upper body strength through push-up assessment. Assessed flexibility through sit-and-reach assessment. Of the 66 children tested 58% were males. Forty-eight percent of sample were classified as overweight/obese and 58% did not achieve healthy fitness zone for all assessed indicators. Females scored higher on fitnessgram than did males. Healthy weight participants had higher fitnessgram scores. Both genders had high rates of upper-body strength. Males and females had lower success in abdominal strength and flexibility and classification in the overweight/obese category attenuated these results. Overweight/obesity is high in this population and appears to play a role in overall body fitness. Both genders had poor flexibility and abdominal strength which may be due to high amounts of sedentary time. Females had higher stamina than males indicating that gender may play a role in stamina-building event participation. These results suggest that overall fitness level is low for this population and interventions to address these weaknesses is warranted.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Review prevalence and consequences of excess weight in AI Children
  • Discuss importance of assessing whole-body health to include physical fitness using the Fitnessgram
  • Review outcomes of fitnessgram assessment in AI children
  • 2:45 – 3:45 P.M.Room P
    David LittleSun, Isabel Coronado

    The American Indian Criminal Justice Navigation Council

    In the past five years, the number of American Indians incarcerated in Oklahoma has increased by 27%. According to the Vera Institute, a non-profit in New York City, “73,100 of our family members, friends, co-workers and neighbors were in Oklahoma’s correctional system when tallied on December 31st, 2016. They were either in a county jail, in state prison, or on probation or parole.” Sad to say, this number is increasing… Our unique program uses peer-to-peer trainers, or navigators, to educate offenders, families, and officials on the criminal justice system and family resources. Navigators are ex-offenders who help offenders understand their rights, roles, and responsibilities in being active participants in their own cases. Navigators work side by side with our tribal, state, county, and federal officials in identifying gaps in the criminal justice reform. The overall goal of this program is to lower the recidivism (reoffending) rate among American Indians, while creating success stories within our tribal communities. The SPTHB has formed the American Indian Criminal Justice Navigation Council, which includes not only navigators, but officials from the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, tribal reintegration programs, tribal leaders, tribal council members, the Oklahoma Secretary of State’s office administrators, as well as various other tribal, state, federal, and county partners who are all dedicated in finding gaps in the criminal justice reform for the state of Oklahoma.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the current state of incarceration among American Indians
  • Understand the plan of action and the initiative the AICJNC has created
  • What others can do to help the AICJNC
  • 2:45 – 3:45 P.M.Room Q
    Julia Soap, MPH, Zach Stein, MPH, Sophia Crossen, MS

    American Indians and Emergency Room Data from the Kansas Syndromic Surveillance Program

    The Kansas Department of Health and Environment’s Bureau of Epidemiology and Public Health Informatics maintains the Kansas Syndromic Surveillance Program (KSSP). KSSP collects near real-time information from hospital emergency departments (EDs) in order to detect syndromes affecting populations. Previous studies have shown that American Indians have high ED utilization rates. The Indian Health Service and tribal health facilities in Kansas do not have emergency departments, so Kansas tribes rely on state-level syndromic surveillance data. Race is a required field for emergency department reporting. The quality of the race variable, including American Indian race, found in KSSP has not previously been analyzed. This project aims to explore the accuracy and completeness of the American Indian race field compared to other races. Results will include the overall percentage of visits by race and a list of the major syndromes that are detected when stratified by American Indian race. KSSP data are limited by the number of reporting hospitals, as well as the timeliness and quality of hospital data submission. KSSP data may enhance collaboration between Kansas tribes and KDHE in order to identify preventable emergency room visits among American Indians.
    Learning Objectives:
  • To learn an overview of the Kansas Syndromic Surveillance Program (KSSP)
  • To learn about the data quality of the American Indian race variable collected by KSSP
  • To identify the most prevalent syndromes affecting the AI/AN population
  • 3:45 - 4:00 P.M.

    BREAK

    4:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room J
    Michael Figgins, Stephanie Hudson

    Medical/Legal Partnerships: Addressing Social Impediments to Health

    Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma and Oklahoma Indian Legal Services will jointly present a session on Medical-Legal partnerships (MLP). Session will include definitions, examples of how a MLP reduces costs and provides for better health outcomes; and experiences with current Oklahoma MLP's that are up and running and how to create and fund a MLP.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will learn about how the social determinants of health impact health care costs and outcomes and how a Medical-legal partnership can address the root causes of ill health as a supportive partner of the health care provider.
  • 4:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room K
    Sucharat (Gift) Tayarachakul

    Maternal and Child Health for American Indian/Alaskan Natives: Highlights from Four Surveillance Systems and PPOR Research Project

    American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations experience large disparities in many health areas, including maternal and child health. To assess the problem for Native women and children in Oklahoma, the Southern Plains Tribal Health Board and the Oklahoma Area Tribal Epidemiology Center collaborate with Oklahoma State Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Services in gathering data from four different surveillance systems, Oklahoma Vital Statistics, the Oklahoma Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), The Oklahoma Toddler Survey (TOTS), and the Oklahoma Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS), to create a Maternal and Child Health Data Book, American Indian/Alaska Native, 1st edition. This session will highlight selected findings on various maternal and child health topics, including reproductive health, prenatal care, prenatal substance use, maternal health, infant health, child health, and childhood home environment in the Oklahoma Native community. This session will also discuss a current research project that investigate the likely cause of fetal and infant death by using Perinatal Period of Risk (PPOR).
    Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will gain knowledge on current data related to Maternal and Child Health among American Indian/Alaska Native in Oklahoma
  • Participants will be able to identify the Maternal and Child Health-related disparity between Native, non-Native, and national populations
  • Participants will be aware of the current research project Perinatal Period of Risk for American Indian/Alaska Native in Oklahoma
  • 4:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room L
    Stephanie BadSoldier Snow, Sean A. Bear I

    Native Women’s and Girls’ Health: A Holistic Approach

    A holistic approach to Native female health, which covers spiritual, psychological, emotional and physical personal wellness.
    Learning Objectives:
    Importance of self-care/self-love, the sacredness of Woman Benefits of physical activity and healthy eating Importance of mental and emotional wellness
    4:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room N
    Amanda Janitz, Ph.D., Sydney Martinez, Ph.D.

    Data into Action for Tribes (cont. from pre-conference)

    The Association of American Indian Physicians, with expert consultants, offers this free one day training on how to access and utilize available data for local level public health action under a cooperative agreement with the CDC. The DIA training will focus on how to obtain data for grant opportunities and use data to conduct community needs assessments. Participants need to bring a laptop with internet capability and a health topic for developing a community assessment for hands on training with individual guidance. A few laptops and project ideas will be available, if needed. Seating is limited. Confirmation of acceptance will be provided via email.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Gain tools and knowledge in the use of Tribal public health data
  • Conduct a Tribal Community Needs Assessment
  • Better understand Tribal Epidemiology Centers as Public Health Authorities
  • 4:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room O
    Lindsey Wiley
    This presentation will provide you the ways of developing a Quality Improvement (QI) team within your clinical setting that will help you focus on measure data collection including attaining a baseline measurement and setting goals for improvement. Learning more about QI tools that are available will aid with improvement in quality reporting programs such as MIPS or GPRA measures. Help your clinic get credit for the good work they are already doing by making sure documentation is entered in the proper fields to ensure proper output of quality reports within your electronic health record.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify when you should start Quality Improvement
  • Be able to reiterate how to develop and facilitate a Quality Improvement team
  • Be able to define an improvement measures
  • Identify at least 1 Quality Improvement tool to use for displaying improvement data
  • 4:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room P
    Dr. Amber Anderson, Randi Hudson-Skender, LCSW

    Building Suicide Aware Systems

    The purpose of this presentation includes creating quality and lasting systemic change in support of best practices in screening, intervention, and follow up of suicidal patients. Ideas for universal screening implementation, utilization of integrated care, and development of one-to-one observations for those at risk will be discussed. The Chickasaw Nation's work in these efforts will be utilized as an example of a progressing system.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will learn how our suicide aware system was built.
  • Participants will learn more about the zero suicide initiative.
  • Participants will learn about the importance of universal screening and how this is carried out.
  • 4:00 - 5:00 P.M.Room Q
    Magdalene Quintero, Dr. Judith James

    Increased Frequency of Liver and Myositis Specific Antibodies in American Indian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Subjects

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease more prevalent and more severe in American Indian (AI) populations. AI SLE patients are more likely to develop autoantibodies with unknown specificities compared to other races. Previously, we observed that autoantibodies to M2 mitochondrial antigen are over-represented in AI SLE patients. The goal of this study was to explore the frequency of these autoantibodies in a broader sample selection and in comparison to other races. Age, sex and ANA titer matched AI, African American (AA) and European American (EA) serum samples were screened for reactivity to an autoantigen protein array. SLE subjects with reactivity 3 standard deviations above control sera were defined as positive for a given autospecificity. The frequency of positive autospecificities was compared across races. AI SLE subjects have autoantibodies to a broader range of autoantigens compared to AA or EA subjects. Autoantibodies to myositis antigens, TIF1γ, SRP54 and PL-7, occur at a higher frequency in sera from AI SLE subjects compared to AA SLE subjects. The frequency of M2 autoantibodies, specific for primary biliary cirrhosis or LKM1 autoantibodies, specific for autoimmune hepatitis are greater in AI SLE subjects compared to AA or EA subjects. AI SLE subjects, positive for M2, LKM1 and myositis autoantibodies are likely to have elevated liver enzymes or myalgia but only a small number of these subjects have been diagnosed with PBC, AIH or myositis.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus is more prevalent and more severe in American Indian populations.
  • American Indian systemic lupus erythematosus patients are more likely to develop novel autoantibodies compared to patients from other races.
  • Our research suggests that autoantibodies specific for primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and myositis are more prevalent in American Indian populations.
  • 5:00 - 6:00 P.M.

    Evening Meal

    6:00 - 7:00 P.M.

    Cultural Event, N8V Generations

    7:00 A.M.Ballroom 3-4

    GENERAL SESSION

    GENERAL SESSION
     
    7:45 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Open Registration
     
    8:30 – 8:35 A.M. Blessing: Clarence Yarholar
     
    8:35 – 8:50 A.M. General Session Opening Remarks: Governor Anoatubby, Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma
     
    8:50 – 10:00 A.M. Keynote Presentation: Chasing Hope, Parents of a Child with Special Needs Alex Smith, Dr. Laura Riffel, Jenniafer Walters, Tara Hood, Aietah Stephens, Judith Ursiti, Ellen Kimbrell
     
    Breakthroughs in your child's development are moments we celebrate! Knowing how to navigate through difficult paths, setbacks, and hard conversations in your child's development is key to finding and building upon moments like these. As special needs continues rising at an alarming rate around the world, families are hurting and need help and hope in tangible, easy-to-understand ways. Our goal is to help parents of children with special needs become their child's best expert in care. To do that, we have to begin the course to having genuine and open discussions with parents, clinicians, and educators who know the struggles and gaps in our health, education, and mental health systems, but are committed to finding the best education, resources, and support in their child's care. Let's begin getting comfortable with uncomfortable conversations. Let's join together existing coalitions and achieve greater efficiency and begin to close existing service gaps to meet the unique needs of each child and family.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Use the panel and panel discussion as a glimpse of the culture, resources, education, training, and support that parents, caregivers, educators, and clinicians can use to create a better environment for the entire family.
  • Identify funding opportunities, service gaps, and resources for special needs services and discuss how parents of special needs children can recognize and access specific first steps, therapies to explore, and professional partnerships that they may need.
  • Identify ways we can bridge the gap and bring more awareness so that more people can understand and connect in a positive way to those with disabilities.

  •  
    10:50 – 11:00 A.M. Break
     
    11:00 – 11:30 A.M. Awards Ceremony: Youth Award, Community Advocate Award, Sally Carter Award
     
    Special Presentation: Sally Carter Tribute
     
    11:30 – 12:15 P.M. Plenary Presentation: Tribal Sovereignty and Why It Matters Casey Ross
     
    The session will focus on the development of tribal sovereignty as a legal doctrine, with a specific focus on tribal law's protection of sovereign interests. Attendees will also examine the importance of tribal sovereignty in the context of public health programs, particularly relating to inter-governmental cooperation.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the legal framework of tribal sovereignty.
  • Articulate how tribal laws are designed to protect tribal sovereignty.
  • Understand why tribal sovereignty is important for American Indian tribes.
  • Analyze how public health programs and inter-governmental relations can be enhanced by an understanding of tribal sovereignty.

  •  
    12:15 – 1:15 P.M. Lunch Tribal Public Health Academy Presentation
    1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room J
    Carly Putnam

    Policy Updates

    State-level overview of health care policy issues and information regarding any recent changes in legislation that could impact health care.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Understanding health care challenges in Oklahoma
  • Understanding State-level policy changes made in recent years
  • Understanding impact of health care policy changes on all Oklahomans
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room K
    Jaci McCormick, Dr. Martina Whelshula

    Rise Above: Empowering Youth Through Sport

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are at risk of not reaching their full development potential because they suffer from the negative consequences of living in fragmented families, generally have low educational attainment levels, and many suffer from poor mental health. These development conditions are a determining influence on the chances of success later in life. Other issues, such as chronic poverty, historical trauma and the lack of responsive social service programs, exact large costs on individuals, their communities and society more generally; thus compounding the nature and scope of the problem. RISE ABOVE is a Native Owned and Operated 501(c)3 that highlights the positive image benefits of an active lifestyle to reduce the use of alcohol, tobacco and drug use by tribal youth in addition to improving their overall physical and mental health. By using sport as a modality to empower native youth to live healthy lives, RISE ABOVE aims to increase the likelihood of positive outcomes for AI/AN children and decrease risk factors leading to poor mental health, suicidal ideation, incarceration, substance abuse and chronic diseases, such as diabetes. The project model is based on the Behavior-Image Model (BIM) that integrates the prevention of harmful behaviors with the promotion of healthy habits, in brief, locally designed interventions. It directly supports fostering the development of a strong sense of identity, developing skills to cope with challenges, supporting access to make positive choices, and fostering intergenerational, culturally responsive family connections in traditional and emerging modalities. The project yields benefits to AI/AN youth, the reservation based programs serving them, and tribal communities in Indian Country. Through a collaboration with RISE ABOVE, reservation-based programs serving AI/AN youth will have the increased capacity to design and implement tailored programs with local feedback and data, increased local coordination among child-serving systems, demonstrate increased in the delivery of trauma-informed care practices within child-serving systems, and increased cultural sensitivity in the delivery of support services for tribal youth. Our long-term community-wide outcomes include 1) the development of community advisory councils, 2) development of community-specific intergenerational action plans, 3) local/regional youth conferences and 4) increased local peer leaders. In addition, there are objective specific outcomes (short-mid range) expected to influence demonstrated needs related to family health, educational support, and positive self-image. This project will influence thousands of youth across Indian Country over the next five years and provide a generation with the tools to RISE ABOVE.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Awareness
  • Why working with children and creating resiliency at a young age is so important
  • Long-term positive effects for American Indian/Alaska Native Youth
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room L
    Jim Jarvis, MD

    Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Creating Awareness

    This interactive presentation will provide information about what are adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and some prevention techniques in order to raise awareness. ACEs is the term given to describe types of abuse, neglect, and household challenges that may have been experienced by individuals under the age of 18. These experiences have been linked to reduced health and well-being later in life. CDC estimates that the lifetime costs associated with child maltreatment at $124 billion. The presenter will describe how these adverse childhood experiences can be prevented. Native Americans have protective factors built into their communities and families that can help mitigate the effects of these ACEs. Two brief videos will be shown, one that describes what ACEs are and the other will highlight some alarming statistics about the occurrence of ACEs in Oklahoma. The presenter will facilitate a discussion with the participants to gain insight into how to raise awareness of this preventable situation and spread the word throughout AN/AN communities throughout the United States.
    Learning Objectives:
  • The participants will be able to identify some Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).
  • The participants will be able to list some mitigating factors to prevent ACEs.
  • The participants will be able to identify mechanisms to raise awareness about ACEs.
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room N
    Amanda Janitz, Ph.D., Michelle Hopkins

    MSPI/DVPI Grantee Technical Assistance Session: Grantees Only

    The purpose of this breakout session for MSPI and DVPI grantees in the Oklahoma City Area is to provide updates regarding contact information and discuss technical assistance needs for data collection. Facilitators: Michelle Hopkins and Amanda Janitz.
  • List at least 3-4 questions that should be asked about a funding opportunity before making the decision to write the grant.
  • List at least 2-3 funding resources for health programs.
  • Outline 5-6 key criteria for a “winning” grant proposal.
  • Describe some ways to make a grant “unique.”
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room O
    Steven Goldman

    Tribal Health and ACA Marketplace Insurance Plans

    ACA Marketplace health insurance plans remain available throughout 2018 (and likely 2019), providing an useful option for coverage with both physical and mental health benefits. New analysis shows that many Tribal individuals and families at low income are eligible for $0 monthly premiums in Oklahoma, along with the $0 deductible/$0 out of pocket special protections of "zero cost-share" Tribal plans. The financial focus on reimbursement from an insurance company versus limited Purchased and Referred Care (PRC) funds will be discussed. Adapting national AI/AN messages about health and insurance plans to be Oklahoma-specific will be important for expanding enrollment beyond the approximately 10,000 Tribal Nation members in Oklahoma currently with Marketplace health insurance plans.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Identifying Tribal Members who may benefit from a Marketplace plan and understanding Marketplace application system
  • Discovering which cultural messages motivate health provider visits and insurance plan sign-ups
  • Understanding the financial system of health insurance costs and benefits
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room P
    Jason Champagne

    Native American Foods Used in Contemporary Dishes

    This is a visual cooking demonstration that is aimed at empowering and inspiring Native American people through traditional foods education, and increased knowledge of basic cooking skills. It is important for people to understand the basics of culinary arts, and incorporate basic cooking strategies to improve the overall nutrient content of foods. It uses traditional Native American foods and incorporates them into contemporary food dishes. It is very important to teach how, and why, incorporating basic nutrition education into everyday meals can assist with overall health and wellness. The overall goal of the presentation is to help participants focus on healthy portion sizes and cook with whole foods; showing how to make healthy food taste good and look good within a tight budget. Indigenous foods are a path to health and a way for us to recover our communities. Healing is the most important ingredient in Native American cooking. It is my hope this presentation will encourage and inspire creativity and imagination with the food our people prepare and eat, helping them to achieve a better tomorrow. It is my hope that traditional foods will become the everyday foods for Native Americans again.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Increase knowledge of basic cooking skills, and cooking with whole foods
  • Understand basic cooking strategies to improve the overall nutrient content of foods
  • Increase ability to incorporate traditional Native American foods (corn, beans, squash, wild rice) into contemporary dishes
  • 1:15 - 2:15 P.M.Room Q
    Rochelle Plummer, Michelle Dennison, Ph.D., RD/LD, BC-ADM, CDE

    5210 Community Assessment, Intervention, and Outcomes

    American Indians (AI) have higher rates of obesity-related chronic disease which can be influenced by the 5210 concept. The OKCIC conducted a community needs assessment of the 5210 concept via widespread survey. Participants included adult and pediatric patients and OKCIC employees. Outcomes showed high rates of sugar-sweet beverage (SSB) consumption and screen time and low rates of fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. Subsequent interventions included targeted marketing and education events. Post analysis showed an improvement in SSB consumption, physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption. As a result of community needs assessment and subsequent intervention, OKCIC adjusted and strengthened policies to include standards for healthy employee meals/snacks, increased water service and daily paid physical activity time.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Review process and implementation of community assessment
  • Review outcomes of community assessment
  • Discuss interventions and policy change based on community assessment
  • 2:15 - 2:45 P.M.

    Break: Healthy Snack, Poster Session, Booths & Networking

    2:45 – 3:45 P.M.Room J
    Jennaifer Walters

    Epilepsy 101

    Jenniafer Walters with The Epilepsy Foundation of Oklahoma will be educating on epilepsy and provide first aid training on epilepsy. A seizure kit will be available for participants. The seizure kit is very educational and has a seizure DVD that each teacher and nurse can use for reference for years to come. We will also welcome questions.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Different type of seizures and their descriptions
  • Side effects of seizure medication
  • What it is and how it is diagnosed,
  • How to handle a seizure and when to call 911
  • Understanding behavioral, learning and disorder associated with epilepsy
  • Additional information on how seizures effects children/teens
  • 2:45 – 3:45 P.M.Room K
    Keasha Myrick

    IHS OKC Area Oral Health Updates

    Indian Health Services National Oral Health Initiatives are formulated to provide systemic outcomes to achieve over a specific length of time. These initiatives for 2010-2018 include early childhood caries, periodontal disease, access to dental care, oral disease burden, perceived quality of care, and integration of oral health. One main focus is to reduce oral health disparities by increasing access to care and providing quality care as primary health care.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Identify six oral health disparities American Indians/Alaska Natives experience within their communities.
  • Understand the purpose of the Oklahoma City Area Dental Support Center.
  • State three strategic goals of Indian Health Services National Response to strengthen the oral care access of the American Indians/Alaska Natives population.
  • 2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room L
    Mashel Sourjohn, Tewana Edwards

    Family Caregiving: Prepare to Care

    Caring for a family member or close friend is one of the most important roles you'll play. It may start with driving your loved one to get groceries or to the doctor. Later, you may find yourself taking more time off from work, preparing meals or handling bills. AARP will present practical tools, resources and guides to help you care for your family member or close friend.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Learn the needs, wants and perceptions of American Indian and Alaska Native family caregivers.
  • Learn where to access tribal, federal, state and local resources to support a family caregiver.
  • Learn the importance of why employers should create a caregiving-friendly workplace and how to support caregivers in the workplace.
  • 2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room N
    Joe Law

    Respecting the Indigenous Relationship to Tobacco

    Many Tribes across the Nation have a time immemorial relationship with tobacco. Commercial tobacco abuse is highest amongst American Indian and Alaska Natives. Although not all Tribes/Villages have a cultural relationship with tobacco, this workshop will attempt to educate participants on a nationwide plan to encourage keeping tobacco sacred and reduce commercial tobacco abuse. Discussion will include traditional uses of tobacco and examples of medicinal plants used for tobacco; national Tribal, Urban and Indian Health Service plan to reduce commercial tobacco abuse, and cessation
    Learning Objectives:
  • Participants will learn examples of and traditional uses of tobacco
  • Participants will actively participate in discussions promoting commercial tobacco prevention
  • Participants will learn the six focus areas of a nationwide plan to reduce commercial tobacco abuse
  • 2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room O
    Carrie Brown, Tabatha Harris

    Tribal Cultural Competency: Understanding Cultural Sensitivity

    Tribal Cultural Competency (TCC) , what is it? Who is responsible? How do you apply TCC in the work environment? This presentation will define what is cultural competency, and how a Tribe can develop a training (TCC) to be used for non-Native entities or individuals. The main objective is how to overcome cultural sensitivity issues in the work environment.
  • Defining Cultrual Competency
  • Developing Tribal Cultrual Competency
  • Creating proactive work relationships with non-Native entities or individuals
  • 2:45 - 3:45 P.M.Room P
    Cristina Arriens, M.D., M.S.C.S., Joan Merrill, M.D.

    What is Lupus & Why Are Clinical Trials So Important for Lupus Patients? Also, Referring Patients for Clinical Trials

    The presentation has two parts. The first contains an update on lupus including information on disease pathogenesis, therapies, and importance of clinical trials for improving therapeutic strategies. The second discusses culturally competent communication, past abuses of research patients, current protections for research patients, informed consent, and strategies for discussing clinical research including referral to research centers.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Apply techniques to empower patients to participate in clinical trials
  • Define the importance of minority involvement in clinical trials
  • Identify cultural aspects of trial participation
  • Summarize “two-way” listening skills between the patient and clinician
  • Describe how minorities are disproportionately affected by autoimmune diseases such as lupus
  • 2:45 – 3:45 P.M.Room Q
    Heather Kimbley, Kevin Short, Ph.D., Jennifer Chadwick

    Associations Between Physical Activity Perceptions and Behaviors in American Indian Youth.

    To address the high prevalence of diabetes in American Indians (AI) youth we conducted a trial designed to promote exercise behavior in AI adolescents. As part of that trial participants completed questionnaires to assess their attitudes and perceptions about physical activity. The purpose of this analysis was to measure the strength of correlations between those perceptions and body composition, physical activity, and aerobic fitness. METHODS: We enrolled 81 overweight/obese (OW/Ob), non-diabetic AI boys and girls from rural SE Oklahoma, 11-20 years old, with low physical activity, for the exercise intervention, and 39 normal weight (NW) peers from the same communities. A 15-item questionnaire with a 5-point scale was used to record the perceived comfort and enjoyment of physical activity. Body composition was measured with bioelectric impedance, aerobic fitness as peak oxygen uptake (VO2pk) on a cycle ergometer, and physical activity (daily steps) with a pedometer. The OW/Ob group was instructed to exercise 3 days per week for 48 weeks at their local Choctaw Nation wellness center. DISCUSSION: Perception of physical activity among AI adolescents varies with body weight and objectively measured physical activity and aerobic fitness. The same perceptions, however, did not appear to influence the level of participation in the exercise program. Thus, physical activity programs may need to be tailored to address additional barriers to optimize participation.
    Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the concept of "perception of activity" and how it can be measured.
  • Measure perception of activity, and factors associated with those perceptions, in AI youth.
  • Determine how information about exercise perceptions may be used to promote physical activity behavior in AI youth.
  • Register to Tribal Public Health Conference 2018 now

    Pre-register now and we’ll contact you with more details when it’s time to complete your registration.

    Highlights of the Tribal Public Health Conference 2017

    • They have a voice, a very strong voice that they're not afraid to use.

      Lancer Stephens

      Lancer Stephens

      Director Oklahoma Shared Clinical Translational Resources
    • Southern Plains Tribal Health Board should be applauded for the work that benefits not only your community, but raises the bar nationally.

      Michael Bird

      Michael Bird

      National Policy Council of AARP
    • (The conference) was great! You served us lunch, we had badges, registration. Food is always good!

      Kasey Dean

      Kasey Dean

      Absentee Shawnee Tribe, SPF-TIG Tribal Liaison
    • I'm pleased with all the work that they do (here)—the partnerships that they work on so diligently with our community and other states.

      Tewanna Edwards

      Tewanna Edwards

      OK Health Care Authority

    Sponsors

    A huge thanks to all of our wonderful sponsors. We couldn’t have brought all these amazing people and resources together without you!

    Interested in becoming a sponsor?

    If your organization/tribe is interested in sponsoring the Tribal Public Health Conference, we’d love to hear from you. Send us a quick email and we’ll get right back to you with some more information!

    2018 Conference Venue

    NCED Conference Center

    NCED Conference Center is located in Norman, Oklahoma at 2801 East State Highway 9. Click below for directions.

    Get Directions:

    Enter Destination From input field below to get directions to our event location

    Destination From

    Destination To

    Venue

    2801 OK-9, Norman, OK 73071

    Phone: 405-447-9000

    Website:http://cc.nced.com/

     

    Check-in/Check-out:

    The check-in time is 3:00 pm and check-out time is 12:00 pm. The Marriott Conference Center at NCED cannot guarantee the availability of guest rooms previous to 3:00 pm.  If late check out is required, an additional fee will apply to those requesting late check-out past 12:00 pm.

    Guaranteed Reservations:

    All reservations must be accompanied by a first-night room deposit or guaranteed with a major credit card. The hotel will not hold any reservations unless secured by one of the above methods.

    Method of Reservations:

    Reservations for the Event will be made by individual attendees directly with Marriott Conference Center at NCED’s front desk at (405) 447-9000, Ext.0 with reference Group Code 7346

     

    Use this link for online reservations: https://aws.passkey.com/go/10thAnnualPreparingConference

     

    The following amenities are offered to all NCED guests:

    • 24-hour fitness center
    • Billiards room
    • Outdoor walking tracks
    • Tennis
    • Oklahoma’s largest saline outdoor pool
    • Racquetball court
    • Whirpool & sauna
    • Softball field
    • Indoor track
    • Volleyball
    • Poolside cabanas
    • Hot tub
    • Indoor & outdoor basketball court
    • Golf (Driving range)
    • Massage (By appointment)
    • Tennis court
    • 100% Non-smoking
    • Restaurant & Lounge
    • Poolside bar open seasonally
    • Business center
    • Complimentary parking
    • Airport shuttle (Fee)
    • Dry cleaning service
    • Laundry facilities
    • Gift shop
    • Poolside cabanas
    • Safe deposit box
    • Complimentary WiFi
    • Express checkout

    Transportaton

    Airport transportation and local shuttle are available with reservation. Airport transportation is $32 each way. Shuttle reservations can be made once the guest receives their hotel confirmation through their email. There will be a link at the bottom of the confirmation email to schedule airport shuttle transportation. Local shuttle service is $7 round trip. Please check the shuttle service schedule upon check-in.

    Parking

    Complimentary self-parking available (valet and covered parking not offered).

    Places To Stay

    If you are unable to stay at the NCED Center, consider Fairfield Inn and Suites by Marriot Norman or the Riverwind Hotel both of which are roughly 8 miles from the NCED Center.

    Additional Details

    All the popular attractions of University of Oklahoma are just 2 miles away from the hotel, including the Fred Jones Museum of Art, Sam Noble Museum of Natural History, and the National Weather Center. Oklahoma City is only a short drive away as well, offering up some wild entertainment options including casino gaming at Remington Park Casino, and the brand new RIVERSPORT adventure park for all those seeking some thrills in Oklahoma.

    Join Our Community

    Feel free to reach out to us via our social profiles